Engineering

The Engineering degree program gives students the option to pursue new areas of engineering and interdisciplinary combinations of engineering and other fields. Each student in the Engineering degree program designs a concentration that has depth, breadth, coherence and rigor and also satisfies the Olin College graduation requirements. All paths to graduation with the Engineering degree provide for all outcomes required by the ABET General Criteria.

Students who choose the Engineering degree must submit a plan of study along with their declaration of major. The plan lists the courses the student intends to take to fulfill graduation requirements, and demonstrates that these courses (along with additional required courses) constitute a major in engineering that has depth, breadth, coherence, and rigor.

A set of predefined concentrations in Bioengineering, Computing, Design, and Robotics are provided below. Students may design their plan of study using one of these predefined concentrations, or may create a new concentration that addresses their own interests. Students may choose a name for their self-designed concentration. This concentration name appears on the diploma but not on the official transcript.

The plan of study must be signed by the student’s adviser and two faculty members whose area of expertise is relevant to the proposed area of study (if the adviser’s area is relevant, the adviser can count as one of the two).

Plans of study are reviewed by faculty from the ARB. This group is responsible for checking the following criteria:

  • Do the proposed courses constitute a major in Engineering that has breadth, depth, coherence and rigor?
  • Do the faculty who approved the plan have relevant expertise? Should other faculty be consulted?
  • Is the plan feasible based on a reasonable forecast of course offerings? The availability of faculty and other resources determines which classes are offered and their schedule, which may limit a student’s ability to complete a particular concentration.
  • Is the plan comparable to the sample concentrations and previous student-designed concentrations? If a student-designed concentration is named, is the proposed name accurate and appropriate?

All course plans go through the same review process whether they are modeled after one of the sample concentrations or self-designed. The plan of study is provisional. If approved and completed, a student may use it to graduate. Minor substitutions may be made with adviser approval; substantive changes require approval of the ARB.

Engineering: Bioengineering (E:Bio)

Bioengineering is an interdisciplinary concentration rooted in engineering problem solving and a deep understanding of biology. The E:Bio concentration prepares students to approach problems important to biology, medical research and clinical studies.

Students wishing to pursue the E:Bio concentration within the Engineering major must develop a specific program of study in consultation with bioengineering faculty. As Bioengineering is a very broad field, students should specify the Bioengineering focus area they are interested in on their course plan and choose courses that support their area of study.

E:Bio Math

Four credits of advanced Mathematics appropriate to the program of study

MTH3120Partial Differential Equations

4 MTH

MTH3170Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos

4 MTH

or approved substitutions

E:Bio Biology

Four credits of advanced Biology

SCI2210Immunology

4 SCI

SCI2214Microbial Diversity

4 SCI

SCI2215Emerging Technologies in Cancer Research, Diagnosis and Treatmt w/ Laboratory

4 SCI

SCI2299Special Topics in Biological Sciences

Variable Credits SCI

SCI2299 Special Topics in Biological Sciences offerings may be used as advanced biology by petition only (often the registration materials will specify if it will satisify; otherwise students should petition to have it count via their plan of study).

E:Bio Bioengineering

12 credits of coursework appropriate to Bioengineering

ENGR3610Biomedical Materials

4 ENGR

ENGR3630Transport in Biological Systems

4 ENGR

ENGR3640Tissue Engineering

4 ENGR

ENGR3699Special Topics in Bioengineering

Variable Credits ENGR

ENGR3810Structural Biomaterials

4 ENGR

or approved substitutions

E: Bio Elective

Four additional credits supporting a student's Bioengineering focus area

Bioengineering Electives are additional courses that support a student’s chosen area of focus within Bioengineering (e.g. relevant Physics, Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering, Computing, Electrical Engineering courses that build supporting skills). E:Bio course plans may include classes at Babson, Brandeis, Wellesley, or other institutions. 

Engineering: Computing (E:C)

The Computing concentration integrates the study of computer science and software engineering within a broad interdisciplinary context. The E:C concentration offers significant flexibility, particularly with courses taken off-campus.

E:C Math

MTH2110Discrete Math

4 MTH

E:C Core

ENGR2510Software Design

4 ENGR

ENGR3520Foundations of Computer Science

4 ENGR

ENGR3525Software Systems

4 ENGR

or approved substitutions

E:C Electives

eight additional credits in computing

ENGR3220User Experience Design

4 ENGR

ENGR3410Computer Architecture

4 ENGR

ENGR3540Complexity Science

4 ENGR

ENGR3590A Computational Introduction to Robotics

4 ENGR

ENGR3599Special Topics in Computing

Variable Credits ENGR

advanced computer courses at Babson, Brandeis, Wellesley, or study away institutions by petition

Engineering: Design (E:D)

E: Design is an interdisciplinary concentration emphasizing synthesis, processes and methods of practice that blends engineering and AHSE. The E: Design concentration prepares students to address important societal and environmental needs through design thinking.

E: Design students work closely with the design faculty at Olin to define individually customized programs of studies that meet Olin credit requirements. It remains the student’s responsibility to ensure that their program of study also meets the requirements for graduate programs or professional practice.

Courses used by a student to meet the Design General Requirements may not simultaneously be used to meet the E: Design Core or Elective requirements.

E: Design Elective courses may be drawn from any area including AHSE, Engineering, Science or Math. Students are strongly recommended to consider one or more AHSE courses to meet this requirement. Design Research may be accomplished through an Independent study course advised by the design faculty. Design Research counts as Advanced Design.

E: Design courses may be drawn from cross registration or study away institutions with prior approval by design faculty. Note that courses at design schools will often meet the E: Design Elective requirement and not the E: Design Core requirement.

All E: Design programs of study should be consistent with the student’s educational goals and must contain sufficient depth, breadth, coherence, and rigor. All programs of study must receive prior approval by design faculty.

All E: Design programs of study must fulfill the General Graduation Requirements.

E:D Core

Eight credits of approved Advanced Design courses; Four credits may be met by Design Research

E:D Electives

Twelve credits of approved coursework appropriate to the program of study

E:D Portfolio

Two credits of Independent Study on portfolio creation (optional)

Engineering: Robotics (E:Robo)

Robotics is a multi-disciplinary field. A student may have a passion for the software, sensing, mechanics, controls or integration aspects of robotics. All of these are equally a part of the field of Robotics. Olin’s Robotics concentration deals with the design, construction, operation and application of robots and computer systems including actuation, control, sensory feedback and information processing, integrating significant technology from multiple disciplines, with a focus on the fusion of electrical, software and mechanical engineering.

Students wishing to pursue the E:Robo concentration within the Engineering major must develop a specific program of study in consultation with robotics faculty members. In addition, a plan of study should contain both a statement of goals – including an explanation of focus area – and enough course material to support these goals. Robotics faculty members are available to help develop appropriate course selections.

E:Robo Math

Four credits of advanced Mathematics appropriate to the program of study.  Choose one of:

MTH2110Discrete Math

4 MTH

MTH3120Partial Differential Equations

4 MTH

MTH3170Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos

4 MTH

or approved substitutions

E:Robo Breadth

Four credits of coursework in software AND

Four credits of coursework in mechanical engineering

Appropriate courses in Software may include ENGR2510 Software Design or other courses selected in consultation with cognizant faculty.

Appropriate courses in Mechanical Engineering may include ENGR2340 Dynamics or ENGR3345 Controls or other courses.

E:Robo Depth

ENGR3390Fundamentals of Robotics

4 ENGR

OR

ENGR3590A Computational Introduction to Robotics

4 ENGR

 

AND

ENGR3392Robotics Systems Integration

4 ENGR

E: Robo Elective

Four additional credits of related coursework